Guest Appearances

Torquere Press Call for Submissions: Lessons in Love Charity Sip Blitz

0

Every year, the generous authors at Torquere Press write stories and donate the proceeds of these shorts to charity, with Torquere matching each donation. We call it the charity sip blitz, and this year, our charity is the Point Foundation.

(more…)

Pushing the Envelope in LGBT YA Books: Celebrating Storm Moon Press’ 4th Anniversary with Cody Stanford

1

The main character of my novel Sinews of the Heart is Nikki, a genderqueer transgirl anthrotiger growing up in a world destroyed by hate. In her post-apocalyptic world, she has no models to help her really figure out who she is. No books about being queer that she can read and no role models for sorting out being genderqueer… no stories about being gay or growing up as a boy feeling more like a girl… nothing to help her figure out what she feels both in her heart and in her body. She doesn’t even know what the word “gay” is until Nikki’s mother, sensing what’s going on with her daughter, tells Nikki what it means. When it comes to literature about gays, queers, and transpeople, Nikki lives in a world where the lack of books is as desolate as the ruins of civilization that surround her.

(more…)

The Other Me: Character Interview and Giveaway with Suzanne van Rooyen

1

So, tell us a little about yourself. Who is Treasa Rae Prescott?

Resa, please. Only my folks call me Treasa, and only when I’m in trouble.

(more…)

An Exciting Time for YA LGBTQ Fiction: A Guest Post by John Amory

2

It’s so exciting to be writing (and reading) LGBTQ young adult literature right now. For so long, YA books with gay content were not only few and far between, they were extremely didactic and disavowing, often presenting homosexuality as an issue that had to be dealt with and frequently punished.

(more…)

LGBT Characters and Their Place in Schools: a Guest Post by Johanna Parkhurst

7

Guess what? My YA book Here’s to You, Zeb Pike is coming out soon from Harmony Ink Press. The main characters, Dusty and Emmitt, are pretty excited.

(more…)

The Language of Silent: A Guest Post by Sara Alva

2

I think I might’ve frightened my editor a little when I first sent him an email about Silent, starting with the line: “This one is not grammar check’s friend.” Having worked with me on Social Skills, he was used to my insistence that he teach me about any corrections made to the grammar so I could learn for the future, because, like most people, I just hate making mistakes. He knew I liked big, beautiful and sometimes old-fashioned words (though some of those ended up on the cutting room floor even with SS) and that whenever it sounded natural to a reader’s ear, I’d want “proper” grammar to prevail.

(more…)

8 Things You Didn’t Know About The Sacrifices We Make: A Guest Post by Sophie Bonaste

2

Hello everyone! My name is Sophie Bonaste and I am the author of The Sacrifices We Make This novel is my first venture into the world of publication and I am very proud of it. The YA M/M book was released by Harmony Ink Press on October 3rd. But before I keep talking about me and my book, I want to thank Jamie for allowing me to be here today.

(more…)

Writing Sex and Violence in Young Adult Works: A Guest Post by Cody Kennedy

5

Reading, at its best, is an enthralling experience and our stories stay with readers long after they close our books. Or, we hope they do. Readers first select genre, then further censor leisure-reading material by reading the blurb, sometimes the first chapter on line and, in a bookstore, often read the ending of a book. If the book speaks of a topic that makes us feel uncomfortable, goes against our beliefs, contains things we don’t believe can happen, or touches on an experience too personal or emotional to revisit, readers are likely to turn away from it. Similarly, if a book doesn’t contain a happy ending, the book may not be for that reader.

(more…)

Courage: a Guest Post by Cody Stanford

0

When you know who you really are, sometimes you have to stand up for yourself. Sometimes the people you fight are enemies, but sometimes they’re members of your own family.

(more…)

Smearing the Queer: A Guest Post by Dennis Milam Bensie

2

“People get killed in Chicago,” was my dad’s response when I told him I would be traveling the next weekend to Downer’s Grove, Illinois (a suburb of Chicago) to compete for my high school speech team. It was February, 1983. I had won my sectional speech meet in Poetry Reading and qualified for the state finals. It was a big honor. No one from Robinson High School had ever made it to state finals in speech. Chicago was only five hours away. But to my mom and dad it might as well have been Tokyo or Amsterdam.

(more…)